Addictions | Kay Trotter

By Appointment : Monday to Friday 9am to 8pm & Saturday 8:00 to noon
  Contact : (214) 499-0396

All Posts in Category: Addictions

How to recognize addiction in your teen

According to the 2012 National Survey on Drugs Use and Health, 9.5 percent of youths aged 12 to17 were using illicit drugs.  Many teenagers use drugs or alcohol just to experiment them, out of curiosity or to fit in with the crowd that they want to hang out with.  While some lucky teens experiment and stop or continue to use here and there without getting hooked up, but several stay addicted to drugs or alcohol and later turn into chronic addicts.  It is hard to say who will develop dependency and who will not.

However, the following circumstances can make teenagers more vulnerable:

  • Teens who grow up in a drug infested areas
  • Teen who hang out with grownup who are involved in the wrong activities
  • Teens who are unhappy and experiencing depression, stress or anxiety
  • Teens with low self – esteem
  • Teens who are uncomfortable with others around them
  • Teens who are abused physically, emotionally or sexually and
  • Teens who have anger issues and are defiant

Most teens start with alcohol or marijuana and gradually progress to using other hard drugs.  When teenagers begin using drugs sooner or later they start experiencing negative consequences such as losing interest in studies, cutting classes, playing hooky, violence, unprotected sex, risk of accidents, suicidal or homicidal ideation.

The most common early warning signs are:

  • Sudden mood changesBajeerao Patil
  • Irritability
  • Signs of low-self esteem
  • Uncommon behaviors
  • Staying too long in bed
  • Staying up too long
  • Lack of interest in general activities
  • Poor choices
  • Impaired judgment
  • Fatigue
  • Frequent long-lasting cough
  • Tired or red eyes
  • Frequent arguments
  • Defiance
  • Letting on discipline
  • Unwillingness to follow directions
  • Aloofness
  • Repeated health complaints
  • Lying or dishonesty
  • Things start disappearing from the house including money
  • Decreased interest in school
  • Falling grades
  • Cutting classes
  • Breaking laws
  • Weird sense of dressing (carelessness)
  • Mysterious friends
  • Change in friend circles
  • Spending more time outside the house or in the basement of the house
  • Negative attitude
  • Depression

Mind you, the above-mentioned signs can be of some other problems too.  If necessary you must consult your family physician without unnecessary delay.  Parents can play an important role in preventing their teenage children from using drugs by having open communication, educating them about drugs, demonstrating responsible behaviors (role modeling), and keeping an eye on their behaviors including being mindful of the company they keep.  Once a friend of mine suspected that his fourteen years old son was smoking marijuana, but he wasn’t sure about it.  His son had started bringing home his friends who had never had visited them before.  My friend didn’t know how to find out the truth.  He confronted his son, but his son created a scene and stopped talking to his dad for a while.  However, later his father smelled marijuana in the basement and also found some traces of marijuana there.  The son couldn’t lie any longer.  After the use of marijuana was confirmed, his father warned him not to bring his wayward friends home and also lovingly told his son not to hang out with his friends who are using marijuana or any other drugs.  Now my friend’s son has already completed a degree in Engineering and has well paid job.  Luckily, his marijuana use was found out before it got out of hand by his vigilant parents.  You think about it.

Struggling with addictionthere is help!

PatilPhotoGuest Author | Bajeerao Patil

Bajeerao Patil has been treating addictions as a drug and alcohol counselor for over 25 years. He has Masters Degrees in Social Work and Human Resources. He is an avid teacher of addiction and recovery.  He is affiliated with the Drug and Alcohol Testing Industry Association.  Bajeerao Patil is an author of Insanity Beyond Understanding and Lifelong Sobriety. To learn more about Bajeerao Patil and his work, visit http://www.amazon.com/dp/0989569810/ and http://www.bajeeraopatil.com/.

 

 

Read More

Family Dynamics and Addiction

Is drug or alcohol use/abuse a symptom of a deeper issue for my child or our family dynamic?

There are many reasons why any one individual could turn to drug and alcohol abuse. For many, it is a means to help relax after a stressful moment. Others may partake in order to make a “good time even better.” Regardless of the reasoning, even the most innocent of situations could cause a downward spiral depending on the situation of the individual. For children, this could become a situational hazard that can set them on a dark path for the rest of their lives.

A study performed in 2008 showed that at least 39-percent of children between the ages of 12 and 17 have tried alcohol at least once in their life. Many of these children try it as a result of curiosity. They wish to learn the allure alcohol has for parents and society members. Most of the time, a child may display disgust with the drink and won’t touch another for several years to come. However, there are those that continue the experience for much of the same reasons adults will. Can we see ourselves mirrored in our children?

1. Teenage Justification – Some teens will drink for no other reason than to demonstrate their own sense of being old enough to control their own lives. Other teens will utilize drugs and alcohol as a way to “fit in” with peers. Unfortunately, the process of fitting in could create an addiction to the feeling of belonging as well as the mind-altering state the chemicals provide. For many teenagers, it is a basic need to be liked by those of the same age group. Out of fear that they won’t fit in, they partake in behaviors that the teens rationally wouldn’t subject themselves to.

2. Parental Influence – As children learn a great deal of their behavior from parents as they grow, the influence of using drugs and alcohol can be great. In their young minds, they glorify the parents and assume that this is the behavior that is expected of them as they age. However, the extreme side of the behavior can also be attributed to the actions of the parent while under the influence of a substance. It is two distinct points of view that can have radical motivations of remaining sober or becoming an abuser.

Read more on the role families play in the fight against drugs at The American Mental Health Alliance website, where you will find two great articles; Part I: Impact on the Family and Part II: how recovery for the family offers much-needed hope and healing when it addresses substance abuse as a family disease.

3. A Vacation from Reality – One of the most predominant reasons why so many turn to drugs and alcohol is the feeling of euphoria that is granted. A life can be so disturbingly stressful that an individual needs to have a vacation from reality. For children, many situations are being experienced for the first time. This can become overwhelming for some and the drug or alcohol option could provide reprieve to the situation. Children don’t have the benefits of experience to fall back on and could become addicted to the sensations drugs and alcohol can provide. A child cannot raise him or herself and they do require the wisdom of someone who can help them through trying times.

Feeling overwhelmed, confused, angry, scared and guilty are all perfectly normal feelings for both you and your teen. The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence number one recommendation for parents is to “Take an Active Role in Your Child’s Life.” As the main thing you need to do as parents to be effectively involved in preventing alcohol and drug problems for children.

4. In the Media – A study completed in 2003 showed children between the ages of 12 and 17 were more likely to use marijuana by six times and five times more likely to drink alcohol if they watched at least one “R” rated movie per month. What the study doesn’t show is how often the parent is involved in the child’s life and decision making. Raising a child to respect the difference between fiction and reality could skew those results. An eight-year-old who is taught the difference between fantasy and reality is less likely to have nightmares regarding movies and television shows. Could this style of parenting influence the decisions of children in regards to alcohol and drugs?

Your skills as a parent have a great influence in how your child reacts to specific stimuli. Although you want them to find their own paths as they develop, you shouldn’t stand back and watch them make profound mistakes. It’s your responsibility to root out problems and control the situation before it gets out of hand. It’s your role to guide them into being a productive member of society, not their friend. Children will abuse drugs and alcohol for the same reasons adults do. However, the children can benefit from the parent stepping in and getting to the heart of the problem that is causing the behavior in the first place.

Rachel Thomas Guest Blogger

Rachel Thomas


Author Bio:

Rachel is an ex-babysitting pro as well as a professional writer and blogger. She is a graduate from Iowa State University and currently writes for www.babysitting.net. She welcomes questions/comments which can be sent to rachelthomas.author @ gmail.com.

 

Read More

Prevent Your Teen From Taking Drugs

As I prepare for the Youth Drug Summit “A Community Conservation on Drugs” for the Flower Mound, Highland Village and Lewisville area, I want to share these parenting tips, my thoughts on the important role parents play during the turbulent teen years, and how imperative it is for parents to  join with your teen so together both teen and parent can “Keep Them Safe.”

The single known antidote — the only secret weapon that has consistently proven capable of disarming all known triggers of substance abuse — is the artful application of PARENTING

Prevention Made Simple

The best defense against substance abuse is the creation of an intrinsic belief system, starting around age 3. Once in place, this belief system will shield your child in a way that no lecture, no punishment and no incentive based technique ever could.

All kids are different, as are all parents, but there is one identical masterpiece that every family should seek to paint together before their child reaches the age of 15. The secret masterpiece is a child who truly believes that substance abuse is wrong, and “believes” that it is a threat to their future.

3 yrs belief

FOLLOW THESE TIPS

  • Be there for your teen when s/he needs to get out of a bad situation. Peer pressure is hard to deal with for every teen. You can help your teen deal with saying no to drugs to their peers by being the scapegoat: “I can’t do that, my parents would kill me!” Or be the parent who will pick up your teen without repercussions if s/he finds the party they’ve gone too has drugs available or their date has been drinking.
  • Get to know your teen’s friends and their parents on a first-name basis. Want to know what your teen is up to? Ask their friends. They may not share everything, or much of anything, but you will get a general idea if there are any risk-taking behaviors going on just by how the other teen acts. This is especially true when you get to know your teen’s friends. You will also have stronger support for keeping your teen from taking drugs if you know your teens friends’ parents well enough to use their first name. Building a relationship with them, casual is fine, will give you a leg up if you ever find your teen is doing drugs.
  • Keep connected in the after school hours. If you can’t be home with your teen, call and leave notes. Have another adult supervise your teen or sign them up for an after school program. If these things aren’t possible, establish a routine for your teenager and keep them busy during this time. After-school hours are the single most important time to know where your teens are and what they are doing, as statistics show 3 p.m. through 5 p.m. is a choice time for teens to use drugs. You can prevent your teen from doing drugs at this time through supervision.
  • Talk to your teen often about drugs. Use ice breakers from television shows or the radio in the car. Remember these are conversations, not lectures. And don’t be afraid to bring up the topic of drugs. Kids as young as preschool are taught about drug use in school in positives ways. Your teen knows all about them by the time they get to middle school or high school. When you open the topic of drugs up in conversation, you are letting your teen know that you are available if they need to talk, which is an excellent way to prevent your teen from taking drugs.
  • Get your teen involved in extra-curricular activities. Schools offer sports or clubs and community organizations offer classes and youth groups. These will help them mold their identity in a positive way and give them less time doing nothing and becoming bored. Studies have shown teens that have less time to just hang out and spend more time in organized activities are less likely to do drugs.
  • Ask questions when your teen makes plans to go out. Who will they be with, where are they going, what will they be doing, etc. Then check up on them. Call other parents and do this together. Teens who think they will get caught will be less likely to do drugs.
  • Be a role model. If you drink, drink responsibly – and don’t ever use illegal drugs. You may think that your kids don’t know that you are using, but they do or they will find out eventually. If you do take drugs, seek help and show your teen that you are taking responsibility for your actions.
  • Unite your family against drugs using strong family beliefs. Establish that your family doesn’t use drugs. Not that you will shun your child should they make a mistake, but that your family believes there are other healthier ways to enjoy life and fix problems rather than escaping into a drug haze.

drugs

Always Remember

An Ounce of Prevention

is Worth More than a Pound of Cure

Read More

Addiction. It doesn’t just hurt YOU, it hurts your FAMILY.

Beth gets home from school and finds her mom passed out at the kitchen table. She knows her mom has been drinking all day, just like she does every day. Beth also knows it will be up to her to get dinner on the table and put her younger brother to bed. She is grateful her dad will help her mom upstairs when he gets home from work.

Unfortunately, when there is an addict in the family, it has a profound impact on the entire family. And, for that person who is out of control, they cannot see how it is hurting the family.

Even worse, family members enable the addict’s behavior by giving in to them. Beth makes excuses for her mom and takes over the role her mother should be filling. Or, the daughter of a food addict may purchase junk food to appease the mother. Or, the wife of a sex addict may tell herself she is not satisfying her husband. In other words, they are all enabling the addict to continue their dependency and, ultimately, becoming partially responsible for the behavior.

The Difference Between Use & Abuse

An individual who uses alcohol can have a glass of wine with dinner and forget about it a few hours later. An individual who abuses alcohol will drink to excess and may suffer repercussions.

Casualties of the Disease

Over time, addiction gradually affects the thinking and behavior of each family member until they reach the point where they wonder how they got to be the people they’ve become. They become preoccupied with the addict’s drinking, eating or using either by obsessing about it and ways to control it, or by trying to numb themselves to it and its effects.

As a result of the denial, which is the hallmark of the disease, the family tells themselves it’s not that bad. They cover up for the addict or try to punish them for their behavior. Their lives become centered on the addiction. When this occurs it limits each person’s ability to be emotionally available to the children or other loved ones in their lives, which means they too become casualties of the disease.

The Four Stages of Family Illness

There are four stages of family illness before the family either “bottoms out” or enters recovery.

Stage 1: Concern — This is the stage where family members are acting out of a genuine concern. They are only beginning to experience the effects of alcohol and drug abuse by a loved one. Family members at this stage have no idea what they are up against.

Stage 2: Defense — This happens when family members block out the reality of the situation and are going in and out of denial. During this stage, families are preoccupied with the addict’s/alcoholic’s behavior. They protect the addict by lying to other family members, employers, or to others about his/her behavior.

Stage 3: Adaptation — During this phase, family members try to change their own behavior to adapt to the chemically dependent person’s behavior. This is a critical phase that may cause family members to either become obsessed with the addict, or they may begin to drink or use drugs themselves.

Family members may attempt to become “the perfect person” hoping that will make the addict/alcoholic happy and change his/her ways. It is at this time that family members may begin to feel they are “losing their minds,” become absent minded, feel like failures, and need medical or mental health care. They often give so much to others that they have nothing left to take care of themselves.

Stage 4: Exhaustion — This is when family members defend their use of intoxicant emotions, just like the addict defends his use of drugs or alcohol. They lose their self-worth and experience severe anxiety or depression. All excuses fail and fear rules their lives. They have reached their “bottom.”

Just as when addicts reach their bottom, family members must choose to admit the problem and recover, face insanity or death. They absolutely cannot go on the way things are.

Time to Get Help

The effects of drug or alcohol abuse on families is a serious issue. Unfortunately, there is little the family can do themselves. We recommend finding a treatment center where the afflicted addict can get some professional help.

Family members can also get help through counseling and support groups.

Our loved ones are the most important things on this earth. Don’t let them lose their lives – figuratively or literally. Talk with them about their substance abuse, get educated, and encourage them to ask for help. Family relationships can always be repaired, what most important is saving the addict’s life – and yours.

Addiction Treatment Resources

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism

Narcotics Anonymous  vision is that every addict in the world has the chance to experience our message in his or  her own language and culture and find the opportunity for a new way of life.

Santé Center for Healing Santé is situated on a beautiful hilltop in rural Argyle, Texas and treats adults that are suffer from addictive disorders including chemical dependency and process addiction.

Caron Treatment Centers-Texas provides comprehensive gender-separate chemical dependency treatment programs to meet the needs of young adults and adults.

Dr. Kay Sudekum Trotter – Counseling Services  addictions treatment drug/alochol, Internet and pornography) focuses on identifying the source of stressful situations or unpleasant feelings while recognizing how problematic usage is affecting the individual’s life.

Read More

Addiction hurts you & your family

Addiction can take a significant toll on an individual’s personal, occupational and family life. Whether a chemical addiction (drugs or alcohol) or a behavioral addiction (sex, gambling, technology), the first step in getting help is recognizing the problem.

[button url=”http://www.kaytrotter.com/addiction/” target=”_self” size=”small” style=”limegreen” ]MORE INFO[/button]

Read More

Struggling with Addiction? We can help!

Addiction can take a significant toll on an individual’s personal, occupational and family life. Whether a chemical addiction (drugs or alcohol) or a behavioral addiction (sex, gambling, technology), the first step in getting help is recognizing the problem.

Here are some key aspects to explore:

  • Do you find yourself craving more of the same object in order to obtain previous ‘highs’?
  • Have people been pointing out that you may have a problem?
  • Are you constantly obsessing over the behavior? Does every conversation end up on said topic?
  • Is your work, school, personal or family life struggling as a result of the problem?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be struggling with addiction. In regards to substance addiction, the DSM-IV, the ‘bible’ of psychiatry, recognizes three levels of diagnosis: use, abuse, and dependence. “Substance use” refers to more casual, low-risk addictive behaviors. Abuse indicates that the problem is more severe, and dependence refers to full blown emotional or physical dependence on the substance, indicating withdrawals. Behavioral addiction is measured differently. What most people would term ‘sex addiction’ or ‘gambling addiction’ are referred to as compulsive behaviors. Technological addiction, like playing farmville for 10 hours a day, is not recognized as an official diagnosis. However, more professionals are starting to recognize the destructive effects of technological overuse on individual’s personal, family, and occupational lives.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, the first step is seeking treatment. For an individual who is on the ‘use’ end of the spectrum, a combination of talk therapy and medication could be appropriate.

IF THE INDIVIDUAL IS PHYSICALLY DEPENDENT ON THE DRUG OR ALCOHOL

DO NOT ATTEMPT A ‘COLD TURKEY’ WITHDRAWAL AS THEY COULD SUFFER PHYSICAL DAMAGE

Comprehensive Addiction Treatment Resources

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism

Narcotics Anonymous  vision is that every addict in the world has the chance to experience our message in his or  her own language and culture and find the opportunity for a new way of life.

Santé Center for Healing Santé is situated on a beautiful hilltop in rural Argyle, Texas and treats adults that are suffer from addictive disorders including chemical dependency and process addiction.

Caron Treatment Centers-Texas provides comprehensive gender-separate chemical dependency treatment programs to meet the needs of young adults and adults.

Dr. Kay Sudekum Trotter – Counseling Services  addictions treatment (chemical, Internet and pornography) focuses on identifying the source of stressful situations or unpleasant feelings while recognizing how problematic usage is affecting the individual’s life.

 

Read More
Paste your AdWords Remarketing code here