Equine Therapy | Kay Trotter

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All Posts Tagged: Equine Therapy

Equine Interactive Professional Certification

Both equine interactive mental heath professionals and equine interactive education professionals need to be able demonstrate competent level of training, education and experience in providing equine interactive services. The Certification Board for Equine Interactive Professions Certification is the flagship certification safeguarding the public of the practitioners qualifications to offer equine interactive therapy and services.

Benefits of Certification Board for Equine Interactive Professions CBEIP Certification 

Professional Distinction – Certification provides documented evidence of examination by an independent certifying organization and demonstrates high level of knowledge about the specialized field of equine assisted interaction.

Certification is identified by the public as signifying professionalism, specialized training and knowledge in the field of equine assisted interaction.

As work with equines in mental health and education becomes more readily identifiable by the public, credentials such as the CEIP will assist professionals to establish their credibility.

Commercial General Liability Insurance – Coverage with Markel Insurance Company is available to Certified Equine Interaction Professionals whether they own, lease, use their own facility, or are independent contractors traveling to other locations to practice equine assisted therapy or education.

Cristina Rennie MA RCCI – This Certification  shows clients that professionals are wanting to hold high standards in the work and therefore gives people more information about the field and the qualifications a person has… related to informed consent, scope of practice and ethics. – Cristina Rennie MA RCC , BC Canada, www.shamrockcounselling.com

Ann Alden, MA, CEIP-ED – I took this exam when it was first offered and have renewed it once already. I highly recommend it because it is independent of any model or organization. Instead it is independently tested in a way that allows the applicant to demonstrate their knowledge, experience and competence in providing equine-human interactions. I missed a few questions primarily because I have been out of graduate school so long I think. I would personally much prefer to send someone to a practitioner who has this type of certification than one that is limited to one model or type of approach to working with horses to help people. I took the test at a small aviation center near the Tucson airport and was given 2 hours to finish it, more than I needed. – Ann Alden, MA, CEIP-ED, PATH International Certified Instructor and Equine Specialist in Mental, Health and Learning., Sonoita, AZ, Www.borderlandscenter.com

CBEIP Certification – Study Guide

By Barbara Rector

In answer to questions on what to study for the domains of competency covered in the CBEIP exam. Here are some ideas that will help as you prepare to take the exam. The administrative and horses questions specific to experiential education and/or mental health is best done from my perspective through review of your common sense practices offering your services with the help of horses.

There undoubtedly are cultural influences imbedded in the questions just as there are different ways of keeping horses humanely depending on your area of the country or world.

Best to review the Adult D level Pony Cub curriculum or your favorite book that offers basic skills of horsemanship information. http://tinyurl.com/a4tkpto

Watch the videos on line of the horse behaviors put out by Penn State at The New Bolton Center.

Review the Standards and Safety Guidelines, just read as if a novel of: PATH Intl, ACRIP or the Pony Club.

Review your particular basic text used when studying experiential education and/or mental health. There are several good suggestions from the CBEIP Handbook in the References list located at the back.

I urge everyone who meets the qualifications for sitting the exam to have a go at it. Don’t worry about passing. You may miss a number of the questions and still pass, (80% is required to pass), and you can take the test over until a passing grade is achieved.

If you don’t understand a question or believe there is no good answer, make note of it. Write your rational for your answer and send it to the CBEIP Board to pass along to the Question Developers. It may be that the question requires re-wording or clarification with better references, in which case you may not lose points for an incorrect answer.

Barbara Rector MA, CEIP-ED,
Adventures In Awareness™
520.247.3383
info@adventuresinawareness.net

To find out more about CBEIP Certification please go to their web site http://www.cbeip.com

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Animal Assisted Therapy Case Study: Sam and a therapy horse named Rosie

Guest AuthorDaniella San Martin-Feeney is the Program Coordinator for Chimo Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT). Chimo AAT is a non-profit initiative based in Edmonton, Canada, which facilitates the implementation of AAT programs in health and social service facilities, as well as schools.  Their focus is on mental health, and their mission is to facilitate the use of animals to help those in need.

Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) in its many shapes and forms, can have such an important therapeutic benefit.  AAT can beneficial to clients with diverse goals, and it can take place in diverse settings.  Here is the first of two case studies taken from Chimo Animal Assisted Therapy’s first manual, “Improving Mental Health Through Animal-Assisted Therapy”, by Liana Urichuk with Dennis Anderson.

The first case study shows the role animals can have in helping a client draw analogies between therapy sessions and their day-to-day life.  This case study doesn’t take place in an office, but on a farm!

Case Study 1

SAM AND A THERAPY HORSE NAMED ROSIE

Sam is small for his eight years. His parents described him as a good student, outgoing with lots of friends; that was, until he moved schools last year. Since then his grades have plummeted, no friends come round for supper anymore, and Sam rarely says a word; except to beg his Mom not to make him go to school each morning. Sam refuses to talk with the school counselor, his teacher, or with the play therapist his parents took him to see. Sam’s parents are at their wit’s end. They desperately want their son back, but Sam won’t tell them what is wrong, and the only living being he seems to trust is Benji, his pet guinea pig. Seeing this connection, Sam’s parents take him to a place they’d heard about through their church; a place where they help kids through animals. This is where I meet Sam. I’m working with an Animal Assisted Therapy program in Arizona, and Sam is my newest client.

Sam stands slightly behind his Dad, looking at the ground. He looks scared. I gently explain that there are lots of animals here who would really like to meet Sam, if he wants to. Sam nods tentatively. As we explore the farm and meet first with the smaller animals, Sam starts to talk. First with the dogs and the goats, and then, very quietly, he tells me that he has a guinea pig at home called Benji, and that Benji is his best friend.

In our next session, Sam asks to see the horses. He notices Rosie, standing by herself. ‘She looks lonely’ says Sam, ‘can we bring her in?’. Once in the corral I show Sam how to do a ‘join up’ with Rosie. Sam spends time talking with Rosie and rubbing her, then gently asks her to move away from him. Through this process Rosie decides that Sam is someone to be trusted and respected, so when Sam walks around the corral Rosie follows. When Sam, with a gentle hand on her rose, asks Rosie to back away, she takes a few steps back. As he runs circles in the corral with Rosie trotting at his heel, Sam starts to laugh, and for the first time I see a glimmer of the boy his parents described: confident, happy, and in charge. Leading Rosie back to the field Sam looks me directly in the eye:

“Rosie is so big and I’m so small, but she did what I asked her to do!”

It is then that Sam starts to tell me about the kids at school, situations when he felt very small: the bullying. With Rosie’s help, Sam’s self confidence gradually returned, he talked to his parents and teacher, and together they found ways to address the bullying at their school.

Taken from: McIntosh, S. (2001, Dec.). Four legged therapists reach children in need. Synchronicity. Sue McIntosh has shared much knowledge and expertise with the Chimo Project. Her contributions are gratefully acknowledged.  As published in Improving Health Through Animal Assisted Therapy. L. Urickuk with Dennis Anderson. 2003.

Daniella’s next post on will feature a second case study that shows how a canine named Bishop set the stage for optimal healing.

Visit Daniella at Chimo Animal Assisted Therapy web page: www.chimoproject.ca.

Check our her blog at: http://chimoaat.wordpress.com/.

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What is Animal Assisted Therapy?

Guest AuthorDaniella San Martin-Feeney is the Program Coordinator for Chimo Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT). Chimo AAT is a non-profit initiative based in Edmonton, Canada, which facilitates the implementation of AAT programs in health and social service facilities, as well as schools.  Their focus is on mental health, and their mission is to facilitate the use of animals to help those in need.

Murphy - certified therapy dog

If you’re like most people, even if you’ve heard the term animal assisted therapy (AAT), you’re not entirely sure what it entails.  You know there is an animal or many animals involved, and you assume there must be some kind of therapy!  Well, hopefully this post clears up some of the unknowns for you.

AAT is a goal-directed intervention in which an animal is an integral part of the treatment process.  A therapist who utilizes AAT operates from their professional foundation and facilitates change in a client through the client’s interactions with an animal. AAT differs from other forms of therapy with animals in that AAT is the most clinical of all therapeutic interventions with an animal.  Clients have specific goals set by the therapists, and the outcomes of AAT are measured by the therapist.

Other forms of therapeutic interactions between humans and animals include pet visitation and animal assisted activities (AAA).  Pet visitation allows for informal interaction between animals and clients, however no goals are set and no specific outcomes are expected.  AAA involves the intentional use of companion animals to provide opportunities for motivational, recreational and educational benefits.  Again, there are no set goals for clients participating in AAA.

AAT, AAA and pet visitation all have numerous therapeutic benefits.  There are however, differences between them.  A single client may enjoy the benefits of different types of interactions with animals.  For example, a client may have the chance to cuddle a cat through a pet visitation program.  The visit with the cat makes the client happy, and even helps to relieve some stress.  Later that day, the same client may work with psychologist who is using AAT.  The psychologist may use a dog’s behavior or perceived feelings as an analogy for the client’s behavior, or feelings.  In this way, observing and interacting with a dog may bring about insight about a client’s self, and help the client to progress in their therapy.  In an AAT setting, the therapist is documenting the client’s progress.  Both pet visitation and AAT interactions with animals are beneficial to the client, in different ways.

AAT is used by many different professionals including psychologists, psychiatrists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists, nurses, recreation therapists, teachers, counselors, and other therapists.    It can take place in a variety of settings, from the typical office setting, to a ranch off the beaten path!

Many different types of animals are appropriate for use in AAT.  In urban settings, we most often see dogs, and less frequently, cats.  A popular sub-field of AAT is equine assisted therapy, or equine assisted counseling.  This almost always takes place on a farm or ranch.  Of course, many ranches used as counseling centers are home to many helping critters, and even small animals such as rabbits and birds can be highly effective helpers in therapy.

I hope this helps give you a clearer picture of what AAT is.  Did it help?  Do you have other burning questions about AAT?

Be sure to watch for Daniella  AAT case studies that feature three of her certified therapy dogs: Murphy (pictured above), Marley and Donovan.

Visit Daniella at Chimo Animal Assisted Therapy web page: www.chimoproject.ca.

Check our her blog at: http://chimoaat.wordpress.com/.


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Treating The Autism Spectrum with Equine Assisted Counseling

EPIC Enterprises – Equine Partners in Counseling
The field of Mental Health just entered a whole new arena!

The mission of the EPIC Enterprises is to promote knowledge, research, and practice of equine assisted counseling in the mental health field.

To that end I create this presentation for an EPIC Training that I conducted in 2008 and I wanted to share it with you.

I also invite you to join the EPIC social networking community and join in the conservation

EPIC Facebook: EPIC International Colleagues

EPIC Linked In: Equine Partners in Counseling – EPIC

Coming Soon

My latest EPIC project is a book compiling articles submitted by counselors from literally around the world, sharing their detailed accounts of how they used equine assisted counseling to achieve positive behavior modification with clients in the treatment of myriad issues such as autism spectrum disorders, sexual abuse, anxiety, domestic violence, depression, self-esteem, addictions and conflict resolution.  The intent is to create a groundbreaking resource counselors can consult to offer EAC to their clients, even if they have no prior equine experience.

This fantastic book is being published by Routhledge/Taylor Frances and will be available soon.

If you would like Dr. Kay Trotter to come talk to your group or find out more about her counseling practice, you can contact her at: Kay@KayTrotter.com214-499-0396, or visit her web site http://www.KayTrotter.com.

Dr Trotter also post regularly in her FaceBook fan page http://www.facebook.com/DrKaySudekumTrotter.

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